Tag Archive: Krzysztof Kieslowski


Dir. Krzysztof Kieslowski
(1991, R, 98 min)

Watching The Double Life of Veronique is like trying to read a map without a key. The audio commentary by Annette Insdorf – who authored Double Lives, Second Chances: The Cinema of Krzysztof Kieslowski and appeared in featurettes on each of the Three Colors DVDs – clarifies a few elusive story details, but mostly she clarifies my frustration, which makes me glad I watched the film again, because at least now I’m clear on something. Insdorf explains that Kieslowski didn’t consider himself an artist, because an artist provides answers and he provided questions. But Kieslowski, in playing with narrative form and thematic meaning, toys with and withholds from the audience in a way that becomes tiresome. He leaves us with questions: specifically, what did he make this film about? … Read the rest of my review at Culturazzi.org.

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Dir. Krzysztof Kieslowski
(1994, R, 99 min)

Of Krzysztof Kieslowski’s Three Colors films, Red is the most elusive. It escaped my grasp, ducking around the corners of disconnected plot details and leading us down a diversionary parallel story that finally dovetails in a twist of fate that — is it fate at all? And if so, what is so fated about it? It’s a cosmic coincidence, delivered with a transfixing sense of import. And yet this is also the most thematically blatant of the three films, a call for human connection made through a lonely man spying on his neighbors’ phone conversations … Read the rest of my review at Culturazzi.org.

Dir. Krzysztof Kieslowski
(1994, R, 91 min)
★ ★ ½

White follows the story of a Polish sad-sack emasculated by his French wife and forced to smuggle himself back home, where he rebuilds his life. It’s the second film in Krzysztof Kieslowski’s Three Colors trilogy, but in tone it bears little resemblance to the previous film, Blue, and I don’t think it’s as successful either. Instead of tragedy it delivers black comedy, and instead of depth it stays mostly superficial.

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Dir. Krzysztof Kieslowski
(1993, R, 98 min)
★ ★ ★ ★

Juliette Binoche is the marvelous anchor of Blue, the first part of Krzysztof Kieslowski’s Three Colors trilogy. Her face is mysterious and full of emotion even when it seems still. She plays Julie, the wife of internationally renowned composer Patrice de Courcy, who dies in a car accident at the start of the film, along with their five-year-old daughter. Julie survives the accident, wants to kill herself, but can’t bring herself to.

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