Tag Archive: woody allen


fading gigolo

This is a very goofy premise: Woody Allen convinces his friend John Turturro (who wrote and directed), apropos of nothing, to become a male prostitute. Sounds like the start of slapstick or farce, but Turturro guides it in a much more interesting, more meaningful direction that is attentive to class, gender, and clashing cultures.

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blue jasmine

Dir. Woody Allen
(2013, PG-13, 98 minutes)

When Blue Jasmine starts, it seems like a comedy about class: the title character (Cate Blanchett), a former New York socialite, loses everything and is forced to move in with her working class sister, Ginger (Sally Hawkins), in San Francisco. Their strained relationship at first is like a clash between the haves (superior, condescending) and have-nots (suspicious, resentful) in miniature.

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Dir. Woody Allen
(2011, PG-13, 94 min)

Woody Allen’s Midnight in Paris, which has earned the director his best reviews in years, premiered in May at the Cannes Film Festival, where it was the opening night selection, and what an appropriate selection it was. It’s not set in any real Paris but in a Paris of the imagination, a romantic retreat of art and culture and history, filtered through the wide-eyed nostalgia of an American writer (Owen Wilson), who is periodically transported to the City of Lights in the 1920s, when it was a bohemian mecca filled with chic parties attended by artistic icons like F. Scott Fitzgerald and Pablo PicassoRead the rest of my review at Culturazzi.org.

Martin Landau and Woody Allen, in 'Crimes and Misdemeanors'

Woody Allen is up-front about the themes of his 1989 comedy-drama Crimes and Misdemeanors, but so clear and insightful about them that we don’t mind the direct approach. It is an argument about God. Where is He? Does the world adhere to moral certitude according to His laws? Or is it chaos, a nihilist mash-up of mankind’s basest, most cynical impulses? … Read the rest of my review at Culturazzi.org

Rebecca Hall and Scarlet Johansson, in

Dir. Woody Allen
(PG-13) ★ ★ ★ ½

Woody Allen’s Vicky Cristina Barcelona, my favorite of his films from this underachieving decade of his career, is a romantic comedy about love, but it isn’t romantic about love. It’s too neurotic for that, which is par for the course for the Allen oeuvre. In its gently cynical way, it wonders if there is a right way to love among all the wrong ones.

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